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1st Georgia Infantry (USA)

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For more on the American Civil War the North Georgia mountains see:

Robert S. Davis, Jr., Memoirs of a Partisan War, The Georgia Historical Quarterly, Spring 1996. This article elaborates on remarks made in 1901 by Sion Darnell, founder of two GAR posts and president of the Georgia Department of the Grand Army of the Republic.

A review of the book, Southern Unionist Pamphlets and the Civil War, edited by Jon. L. Wakelyn, University of Missouri Press, Columbia, 573-882-0180, 392 pages.

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Forgotten Union Guerrillas of the North Georgia Mountains

By Robert S. Davis, Jr., with assistance from Bill Kinsland [-1-].

Though it has received very little attention over the years, opposition to secession was very real among the people of extreme north Georgia during the Civil War, despite the fact that support for the Southern cause was also very strong.

The major resistence to the Confederacy centered among the hardy, independant, isolated, north Georgians who simply opposed the intrusion of elements of the war which brought unwanted hardships. Life was difficult enough in the mountains as it was.

The lack of economic necessities coupled with a period of severe climatic droughts that plagued the region during the war years, made the hiding of live stock and foodstuffs from Confederate impressment officers a matter of survival for many mountain families. The additional hardships such as taxes, impressment of private property, and the war's draft, only added fuel to a smoldering resentment.

Problems such as these existed everywhere in the South, but the mountain vastness substantially increased one's capabilities to avoid the unwanted impressments brought on by the war effort.

The most common resistence to the Confederacy in north Georgia and elsewhere in the South, was draft evasion and desertion from the Confederate forces. In mountainous terrain and among sympathetic mountain families, "hiding out" was accomplished more easily than in other parts of the Confederacy. The State of Georgia was occasionally forced to make massive round-ups of these deserters.

The bloody Confederate victory at Chickamauga in northwest Georgia in 1863, was the final straw for many war weary rebels. Of the north Georgians at Chickamauga, many simply quietly returned home without orders. They soon learned that a loosely organized "underground railroad" was already in existence to guide them to the Union lines in Tennessee, should they desire to flee from the South. Once out of Confederate held territory, deserters and draft evaders could join the Union Army or Navy or even travel north of the Ohio River to work for the U.S. Government as cowboys and civilian contractors.

The state of Georgia fought back against deserters by forming what came to be known as Confederate "Home Guards" units from the state militia. These men were authorized to obtain draft animals and supplies for the Confederacy and to deal with draft evasion and desertions.

Tactics used by the Home Guards included torture, executions without trials, and retaliations against families and friends of the resisters. The folklore of north Georgia includes numerous tales of corpses found after the Home Guards had departed, and of men having their Achilles' tendons cut on their feet and being made to walk or crawl for miles before finally being hanged.

Many north Georgians claimed that the Home Guards were nothing more than officially sanctioned murderers and horse-thieves. Pro-Confederate families suffered too. Some men deserted the Confederate Army in order to return home to protect their families from the Confederate Home Guards!

When General Sherman's Union Army invaded north Georgia in 1864, they found that the same people who had been helping men to evade the Confederate draft or desert, were willing to act as spies and guides for the Union, including helping Sherman's foragers seize property from the pro-Confederate families.

The Confederate Home Guards responded by increasing their raids and executions. Sherman, in turn, answered by sending Union troops to Pickens county and elsewhere to rescue the families opposing the Confederacy, and to suppress the Home Guards. Union forces burned Canton, GA, in retaliation for atrocities committed against north Georgia families.

Federal officials believed that resistance to the Confederacy and the Home guards could be channelled into practical support for the Union. On November 18, 1863, twenty-four-year-old Major Dewitt C. Howard of the 103rd Ohio infantry was ordered to form Georgia units for the Union Army. Howard was a Georgian, and judging from the streams of refugees he witnessed daily coming into Federal camps in Chattanooga, he was convinced that he could raise an entire brigade. After several months of detached duty however, he failed to enlist more than a handful of men.

The attempt to recruit a Georgia unit for the Federal forces was revived in 1864 by James G. Brown, civilian chief of scouts for Union General George H. Thomas. Brown had organized a spy ring in north Georgia and often would conduct his own personal reconnaissance missions, sometimes disguised as a member of the Confederate Home Guards!

On August 9, 1864, Brown was ordered by General James B. Steedman to enlist as many men as possible for use in protecting General Sherman's supply Lines in north Georgia. In response, Brown arranged for six companies of north Georgians to gather near their homes in Pickens, Dawson, and Union counties on or about July 1. They included men brought to Cleveland, Tennessee on July 10 by Dr. John A. Ashworth of Dawson County and a Union Home Guards company organized in Pickens County by Federal troops.

At the request of Ashworth, his brother-in-law Iley T. Stuart, raised a company, and in Morganton, William A. Twiggs rallied enlistees with a stirring speech calling for the removal of the Confederates out of north Georgia.

By the end of August, 1864, James G. Brown had approximately 300 enlistees but far from the 800 to 1,000 men he needed for a regiment. As a result, one of the companies raised by Stewart went to Tennessee, and became Company C of the 5th Tennessee Mounted Infantry Regiment, U.S. Army, on September 23, 1864. Others who had answered Brown's call served in an independent company in Fannin County under William A. Twiggs that on February 1, 1865, became Company H of the 5th Tennessee.

Brown organized his remaining four companies as the 1st Georgia State Troops Volunteers, with himself as Colonel, Ashworth as Lieutenant Colonel, and Henry L. Carroll of Union County as acting Major. The men were promised a bounty of $300.00, army pay, and clothing in exchange for enlisting for three years to serve exclusively as guards for the railroads in Georgia. They were provided food, ammunition, and probably weapons, but apparently were compelled to take horses and mules from pro-Confederate families.

Despite the circumstances, Brown's unit was never actually accepted into the U.S. Army. The official reason was a precondition of the unit's existence - that being that the unit would only serve in Georgia. However, a more likely reason for this nonrecognition was the unsavory reputation these men earned for themselves in the months between when Brown first recruited them, and when they were finally released from their duties.

Col. L. Johnston, commanding the largely black garrison at Dalton, later blamed his surrender to General Hood's Confederate Army on October 13, 1864, upon the men of Brown's 1st Georgia State Troops. Johnston claimed that the men of the 1st Georgia failed to do their duty as scouts, and when Hood's army approached, they fled to the mountains, as they had done upon the approach of Wheeler's Confederate cavalry on October 2.

On November 5, while on a raid to obtain horses and mules, Lt. Col Ashworth, Capt. McCrary, and nineteen other members of Brown's command were captured by Col. James J. Findley and his 1st Georgia State Cavalry Home Guards at Bucktown in Gilmer County. Three others of Brown's command were wounded and four were killed. Captured with these men were papers that gave the names of their local supporters, including such prominent men of Dawson County as Sheriff George R. Robinson, justices Cleveland Andrews and John Fouts, Lindsey Vaughters, and Hiram Brooks.

As Findley took his command through Dawsonville, these civilians were arrested. A dozen of the men captured turned out to also be deserters from Confederate units. They were executed at Gainesville on November 7, 1864. Their bodies were transferred to the National Cemetery at Marietta, GA, inJuly, 1867. They are today buried in Section E, Numbers 6012-6023.

Col. John Azor Kellogg & a union escapee from a Confederate prison in South Carolina, had more positive experiences with Brown's men. A group of the 1st Georgia found Kellogg and his companions in Pickens County and, under Capt. McCrary, escorted them safely to the Union lines. Kellogg would remember these men as "generous, hospitable, brave, and Union men to the core." He described them as effective guerrillas, providing armed protection for local farmers against the Confederate Home Guards.

However, if Kellogg's report to his superiors was as accurate as his memoirs, he must have also added that Brown's men were hiding a Union deserter, conducting raids to plunder pro-Confederate plantations in other counties, and refusing to accept offers of a truce by Capt. Benjamin F. Jordan's Cherokee County Home Guards. Hit and run ambushes between Brown's men and the Confederate Home Guards were apparently happening almost daily.

Col. Kellogg was sympathetic to Brown's men, but it is doubtful that his feelings were shared by the Union officials camped safely behind their own armies. Brown's men were not trained, equipped, or led as regular soldiers. They could not be scouts and guides at Dalton while their own families were left unprotected, nor could they allow themselves to be captured at Dalton (or anywhere else), since many of them were also Confederate deserters.

The men of the 1st Georgia however, regardless of the circumstances, could not be prevented from seeking revenge upon the Home Guards, now that they too were armed and organized. They were fighting a mercilous guerrilla war against men who had abused them and their families and friends for several years now, and it had almost become a way of life for many of them.

After the Secretary of War and General Sherman finally decided not to allow the 1st Georgia to be admitted into the United States Army, Brown's men were ordered dismissed on November 5, 1864, and they formally disbanded on December 15, 1864. They received no pay, bounties, or compensation for their months of service, sufferings, and fighting.

Shortly thereafter, Brown again contacted his commanding officer - General Thomas - informing him that 600 or 700 north Georgians could still be raised for the Union Army. Thomas offered to allow them to be formed as an independent battalion or regiment with Brown in command, if they reported to Chattanooga. Nothing ever came of this idea, however.

Many of Brown's men did enlist in the previously mentioned 5th Tennessee United States Mounted Infantry, particularly in Capt. William Twiggs' Company H and Capt. Martin V. Woods' Company K and other Tennessee units. Several of the men of the now defunct 1st Georgia who were captured at Bucktown and elsewhere, were subsequently parolled by Brigadier General William T. Wofford, Confederate commander for north Georgia.

A few of Brown's men however, joined a new 1st Georgia. Dewitt C. Howard created his own 1st Georgia Infantry Battalion (at least on paper), at Marietta on October 31, 1864. Some of the men from Dawson County enlisted in Company A. and some from Pickens County joined Company B. The two companies were filled out with men recruited from Confederate POWs in Atlanta, after the city fell to Sherman. They guarded Sherman's rail lines in the northern part of the state until disbanded on July 19, 1865.

The problems of Brown's men did not end with the war. Civil War related revenge killings continued long after Appomattox. For forty years, the families of Brown's 1st Georgia unsuccessfully petitioned Congress for financial compensation to which they felt they were entitled as a result of their affiliation with the Union cause. They were largely unsuccessful due to the fact that so few of their leaders had survived to help with the petition. James G. Brown remained a scout for General Thomas to the end of the war, and died in late 1866. Dr. John A. Ashworth died in Raleigh, NC ("by reason of starvation and ill treatment whilest a prisoner of war in the hands of rebel authorities"), shortly after General Sherman's army released him from the Confederates. Capt. George W. McCrary was killed by Confederate guerrillas on November 10, 1864. Ironically, he was not serving in Georgia at that time, contrary to the terms of his enlistment, but was in Tennessee.

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Transcribed on the pages which follow are the rosters of Col. James G. Brown 's 1st Georgia State Troops Volunteers, reproduced from memory by men from Brown's command. (Obtained from the National Archives, Washington, D.C., R 882, V.5., 1865, Box 824, Record Group 94). Microfilm of these records has has been donated to the Georgia Department of Archives and History. The original rosters and papers of this unit were destroyed in Hood's attack on Dalton in October, 1864. The names of Dewitt C Howard's 1st Georgia Infantry are published in Robert S. Davis, Jr, A RESEARCHER'S LIBRARY OF GEORGIA, (1987). Their compiled service records are available from the National Archives and on microfilm ree1 279-34 at the Georgia Archives. Members of the 5th Tennessee and other Tennessee units are listed in Pt. II of TENNESSEANS IN THE CIVIL WAR, (Nashville, 1964).

(Information in brackets was added by the authors.)

COMPANY A (Union County). Roll prepared from memory January 10, 1870.

  • George W. McCrary; captain; killed in battle by guerrillas, November, 1864.
  • Henry L. Carroll; 1st lieutenant; (Later in Company B of Howard's 1st Georgia U.S.Infantry.)
  • Leander McCrary; 2nd lieutenant; dead since service.
  • Milton Nix; 1st sergeant; killed at Gainesville; prisoner of war; (Also called A.M. Nix; had been in Co. C, 52nd Georgia Confederate Infantry; buried at National Cemetery in Marietta, GA).
  • Harper McCrarey; 2nd sergeant.
  • Jesse Alien; 3rd sergeant; (later in Co. C, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry?).
  • Henry Ducket; 4th sergeant.
  • Willis McCrarey; 1st corporal; killed by rebels in battle, November, 1864.
  • Roliert Bennett, Jr.; 2nd corporal.
  • William Elkin, 3rd corporal.
  • Jacob Densen; 4th corporal (Later in Co. H, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry).

Privates:

  • Allen, David
  • Ash, Henry.
  • Anderson, John W.

    [Editor's Note: For more information, please contact Glenn A. Anderson, murphy_boyz@verizon.net. Here is a sampling of his research findings:

    John W. Anderson is my Great Grandfather. He lived to sire 18 children and is the progenitor of most of the Anderson's in Fannin County Georgia.

    John's father, Thomas F. Anderson was a member of the ill fated group from Capt Wm. Twiggs group (later Co. H, 5th Tennessee Mounted Infantry, USA) that was captured at Van Zandt's store in Dial. Thomas made his escape at Gaddiston the evening of their capture.

    However, Solomon Stanbury, another of my Great Great Grandfather's serving with Thomas Anderson, and a member of that same group was taken on to Dalonegah and summarily taken out in the dark of night and executed on Beardens Bridge Hill along with Iley Steward and Wm. Witt.

    Thomas Willson, a Gr. etc.Uncle on my great grandmothers side of the family was a part of the same group and witnessed the removal of those three men from the jail at Dahlonegah on the night of their execution.

    I have been working extensively with remaining family members, and have touched base with Jimmy Anderson, Olin Jackson, and William Kinsland with regard to the foregoing, and have worked with the pension records for the widow of Solomon Stanbruy received from Judge Carroll Ross in Athen, Tenn., to reconstruct the service of Thomas Anderson and Solomon Stanbury.

    This has been greatly accomplished and will soon be put up on the www a part of the Anderson Family History, under the title "The Saga of Solomon Stanbury."

    Anyone that wishes to contact me regarding my Great Great grandfather John W. Anderson, his father, Thomas F. Anderson, his brother in law, Thomas Willson or my Great Great Grandfather Solomon Stanbury is welcome to contact me at my e-mail address, above.]

  • Blackwell, Daniel killed at Gainesville, GA, while a prisoner of war, November, 1864. (Had been in Company C, 65th Georgia Confederate Infantry; buried in the National Cemetery, Marietta, GA.)
  • Braidy, Lewis; (Had been in Company D, 52nd Georgia Confederate Infantry; later in Co. H, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry.)
  • Braidy, Braxton; (Later in Company H, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry.)
  • Blackwell, Sidney
  • Bramblet, Jessee
  • Barrett, Thomas
  • Brown, Joseph N.
  • Brown, William (Later in Company B, Howard's 1st Georgia U.S. Infantry).
  • Bramblet, Reuben E.
  • Colbert, James
  • Cockran, James (Later in Company H, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry).
  • Dotson, William (Later in Company H, 5th Tennessee U.S. Infantry).
  • Davis, Benjamin
  • Dowdy, James R. (Had been in Company D, 52nd Georgia Confederate Infantry; later in Company H, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry.)
  • Daniel, Albert
  • Edmnson, Thomas; killed by rebels while prisoner of war at Gainesville, GA, November, 1864. (Had been in Company D, 52nd Georgia Confederate Infantry.)
  • Edmnson, William; (Had been in Company D, 52nd Georgia Confederate Infantry; had been in Company E, 30th Georgia Confederate Cavalry?)
  • Eavens, George
  • Fowler, Johnson
  • Ford, John; (Later in Company F, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry.)
  • Free, Ebenezer
  • Gladen, William; (Had been in Co. D, 1st Georgia State Line Regiment; later in Co. H, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry.)
  • Gilrith, John

    [Editor Note: For more information, please contact Francesca Harris, a descendant of John Gilrith. She writes,"As for family lore, his father, Green Gilreath, fought in Company G, 52nd Regiment Georgia Volunteer Infantry, CSA and his uncle was the company's 1st Lt which must have created much tension in the family with Harvey serving for the north. Green died fighting in the Cumberland Gap in Sept 1862."]

  • Garrett*, Joseph
    *[Editor's Note: If you wish to learn more about the Long, Lovinggood, and Garrett families, please e-mail Sandra Lamb at RGSELAMB@aol.com]
  • Garrett*, Martin L.
  • Garrett*, Robert
  • Griffith, John
  • Griffith, William
  • Hix, James
  • Hopper, Charley
  • Ingram, John
  • Kerby, William; killed in battle, October, 1864.
  • Lacky, Wm.
  • Long*, James M.; (Had been in Company B, 52nd Georgia Confederate Infantry.)
    *[Editor's Note: If you wish to learn more about the Long, Lovinggood, and Garrett families, please e-mail Sandra Lamb at RGSELAMB@aol.com and/or Debbie Woolf, a Long & Thompson descendant, Woolfpac@prodigy.net ]
  • Long*, Joseph
  • Long*, John
  • Long*, James, Sr.
  • Long*, Connord
  • Long*, Henry
  • Long*, Jasper; (Had been in Company B, 43rd Georgia Confederate Infantry.)
  • Long*, William; (Later in Company H, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry.)
  • Long*, Nathaniel B.
  • Long*, James, Jr.
  • Lovengood, William; killed in battle, October, 1864.
    [Editor's Note: If you wish to learn more about the Long, Lovinggood, and Garrett families, please e-mail Sandra Lamb at RGSELAMB@aol.com]
  • Moore, Joseph
  • McCloud, William M.
  • Newberry, Jackson
  • Payne, John; (later in Company B of Howard's 1st Georgia U.S. Infantry?)
  • Payne, George W.
  • Rogers, Joseph
  • Ray, Joseph (Later in Company H, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry.)
  • Ray, Archable; (Had been in Company D, 52nd Georgia Confederate Infantry; later in Company H, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry.)
  • Ray, John D. (Later in Company H, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry.)
  • Ray, Martin; (Later in Company H, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry.)
  • Stanley, William, Sr.
  • Stanley, William, Jr.
  • Stanley, Braxton
  • Stanley, Reculious
  • Stanley, Samuel
  • Stanley, Elisha
  • Tuner (Turner?), William; (Later in Company F, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry.)
  • Thompson, James; (Later in Company H, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry.)
    [Editor's Note: Long and Thompson families, please e-mail Debbie Woolf, Woolfpac@prodigy.net ]
  • Woody, Robert; (Later in Company H, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry.)
Roll certified by Henry L. Carroll, January 10, 1870. 280

COMPANY B (Dawson County). Roll Prepared From Memory January 10, 1870.

  • Alvin W. Prince; captain; wounded in battle.
  • Henry B. Chatlin; 1st lieutenant. (ED NOTE 03-Oct-09: This is a misspelling that should read Henry C Chattin according to his great-greatgrand son, Johnny Chattin. For more information, please contact Johnny Chattin at chattin88@aol.com)
  • James M. Reece; 2nd lieutenant.
  • Martin P. Berry; 1st sergeant; killed by guerrillas; (Had been in Company I, 52nd Georgia Confederate Infantry; later in Company H, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry.)
  • Thomas N. Mathews; 2nd sergeant.
  • Thomas Chatlin; 3rd sergeant. (ED NOTE 03-Oct-09: This is Henry C Chattin's younger brother, Thomas J. Chattin, misspelled. For more information, please contact Johnny Chattin at chattin88@aol.com)
  • William A. Aarnhart; 4th sergeant.
  • Nelson Bearden; 5th sergeant.
  • John T. Spriggs; 1st corporal.
  • James L. Griggs; 2nd corporal; (Had been in Company I, 52nd Georgia Confederate Infantry.)
  • Jeptha Cochran; 3rd corporal; (Had been in Company D, 52nd Georgia Confederate Infantry; later in Company H, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry.)
  • John Reed; 4th corporal; killed at Gainesville, GA, November, 1864; (John A. Reid; had been in Company D, 1st Georgia Confederate Sharpshooters; buried in National Cemetery, Marietta, GA.)
  • Joseph Rider; 5th corporal.
  • W.P. Turner; 6th corporal; (Later in Company F, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry.)
Privates:

  • Ayers, Eliiah
  • Clayton, Elias
  • Burlison, William (Later in Company A of Howard's 1st Georgia U.S. Infantry.)
  • Beardon, R.M.
  • Cochran, Francis M.
  • Cantrell, Andrew J. (Later in Company E, 7th Tennessee U.S. Cavalry.)
  • Dempsey, E.F.
  • Denny, Elisher
  • Dotson, William (Later in Company H, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry.)
  • Evans, John (Later in Company H, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry.)
  • Ewards, Thomas
  • Frix, Pleasant (Later in Company H, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry.)
  • Craine, Yerba
  • Garman, James (Had been in Company I, 52nd Georgia Confederate Infantry; later in Company I, 12th Tennessee U.S. Cavalry.)
  • Gladden, William (Had been in Company D, 1st Georgia State Line Regiment; later in Company H, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry.)
  • Lingefelt, John
  • Lively, John; (Later in Company A of Howard's 1st Georgia U.S. Infantry? Jobry Lively?)
  • Mincy, James; (Reported to have been in Co. E, 30th Georgia Cavalry; captured at Bucktown, Gilmer County.)
  • McDugle (McCugle?), John C.
  • Morgan, Cunningham; died in service.
  • Prince, Martin; (Later in Company K, 12th Tennessee U.S. Cavalry.)
  • Reed, Robert G.; killed in service.
  • Ray, Joseph; (Later in Company H, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry.)
  • Ray, Archibald; (Had been in Company D, 52nd Georgia Confederate Infantry; later in Company H, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry.)
  • Reece, AJ.
  • Reece, (?), Jackson T.
  • Rider, Henry
  • Swaney, James C.
  • Scoogins, William
  • Scoogins, Mathew
  • Turner, O.P.
  • Williams, Wm. W.; (Later in Company A, 13th Tennessee U.S. Cavalry.)
  • Prince, Archibald A.
  • Reece, William
  • Newberry,Hegga
Roll Certified By Alvin W. Prince, January 10, 1870.

COMPANY C (Dawson County) Rolls Prepared From Memory January 4, 1870.

  • Elias Darnel; captain; (Had been in Company I, 38th Georgia Confederate Infantry.)
  • Calvin J. Lawless; 1st lieutenant.
  • John Kelly; 2nd lieutenant.
  • Virgil D. Monroe; 1st sergeant;(Had been in Company I, 52nd Georgia Conderate Infantry; later in Company H, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry. In 1889, he wrote to the National Cemetery in Marietta enclosing the names of the men of Brown's 1st Georgia unit buried there, as "one of their old comrades.")
  • William A. Chumbly; 2nd sergeant; (Later in Company A of Howard's 1st Georgia U.S. Infantry.)
  • John Tatum; 3rd sergeant; paroled under Gen. Wofford.
  • Thomas Darnell; 4th sergeant.
  • Joseph M. Chambers, 1st corporal; paroled under Gen. Wofford.
  • Josiah W. Haithcock; 2nd corporal,
  • Pollard Kelly; 3rd corporal.
  • Jordon Anderson; 4th corporal.
Privates:

  • Anderson, William, Jr.; died since the surrender.
  • Anderson, William, Sr.; died since the surrender.
  • Bennett, Jackson Bennett,
  • Robert Bennett,
  • William Beck, John; paroled under Gen. Wofford.
  • Brooks, Aaron T.; killed at Gainesville, GA, in service, November, 1864. (Aaron Thacker "Zack" Brooks; had been in Company G, 8th Georgia Confederate Battalion; buried in the National Cemetery, Marietta, GA.)
  • Baird, James L.
  • Blackburn, Jesse W. (Later in Company H, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted In fantry.)
  • Braden, Elias W.
  • Carlisles, John
  • Chambers, Phillip; paroled under Gen. Wofford.
  • Carnes (?), Marshall; paroled under Gen. Wofford.
  • Carnes, Tandy W.; paroled under Gen. Wofford.
  • Chambers, Barak; paroled under Gen. Wofford.
  • Carney, Absolem
  • Chumbley,Thompson
  • Densen, Joseph; (Later in Company H, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry.)
  • Densen, George W.; (Later in Company H, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry.)
  • Densen, Jethro
  • Elkins, William
  • Elkins, Jordon; died in service.
  • Evans, Nehe M.
  • Evans, John (Later in Company H, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry.)
  • Fouts, John
  • Hyde, Asa A.; paroled under Gen. Wofford.
  • Henry, Alexander; paroled under Gen. Wofford.
  • Hix, John
  • Kelley, Pollard
  • Kelley, William
  • Ledbetter, Joseph; paroled under Gen. Wofford.
  • Monroe, Daniel P.
  • Monroe, Samuel L.; paroled under Gen. Wofford.
  • Millsips, Solomon; (Later in Company H, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry.)
  • Monroe, Vanburen H.; parolled under Gen. Wofford.

  • Martin, Morgan
    Morgan F. Martin (6K)
    [Editor Note: The named member of the 1st GA Infantry (USA) could be Morgan F. Martin (1842-1906-07), or his father, Morgan, Jr. (1815-1875-80). Pictured is Morgan F. Martin (ca 1900). If you wish to learn more about the Martin family, please e-mail Rachel Holman at genealogy@infoave.net .]

  • McCrary, Julius
  • Millsaps, Stephen S.; (Later in Company H, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry.)
  • Nelson, Henry
  • Pinyan, Jeptha; paroled under Gen. Wofford.
  • Pinyan, Abraham D.
  • Payne, Ambrose
  • Payne, Thomas; killed at Gainesville, GA, by rebels November, 1864, while in service. (Thomas W. Payne; had been in Company K, 52nd Georgia Confederate Infantry and Company G, 30th Georgia Confederate Cavalry; buried at the National Cemetery, Marietta, GA.)
  • Robinson, Andrew J.; killed at Gainesville, GA, by rebels November, 1864, while in service. (Had been in company C, 7th Tennessee U.S. Cavalry?)
  • Robinson, George R.; (Had been in Company I, 38th Georgia Confederate Infantry.)
  • Smith, Collins
  • Simmermon, Jacob
  • Simmermon, James; (Later in Company A of Howard's 1st Georgia U.S. Infantry.)
  • Stone, Jordon; killed at Gainesville, GA, by rebels while a prisoner of war. (Had been in Company D, 52nd Georgia Confederate Infantry; buried at the National Cemetery, Marietta, GA.)
  • Stone, Jeptha
  • Sutton, Amos
  • Tesseneer, James
    [Editor Note: For more information, please e-mail Glenn Woodward at grw@execpc.com]
  • Tatom, Horatio
  • Turner, Tandy W.
  • Vaughters, Linza (Linzey); died since service.
  • Whitmore, Henry
  • Whitmore, William; (Had been in Company I, 22nd Georgia Confederate Infantry.)
  • Whitmore, Charles; killed at Gainesville, GA, November, 1864, while in service. (Buried in the National Cemetery, Marietta, GA.)
  • Willey, John; paroled under Gen. Wofford. (Later in Company H, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry.)
  • Whitmore, Henry T.; hanged by General (?). A Cock(?) in November, 1864.
Certified By Elias Darnell, January 4, 1870.

COMPANY D (Pickens County) Roll Prepared From Memory January 14, 1870.

  • George H. Turner; captain. (Had been in Company E, 23rd Georgia Confederate Infantry.)
  • Robert B. McCutchen; 1st lieutenant. (Later in Company B of Howard's 1st Georgia U.S. Infantry.)
  • Hezekiah M. Parris; 2nd lieutenant.
  • Thomas Taylor; 1st sergeant; killed in battle.
  • William G. Brown; 2nd sergeant. (William T. Brown later in Company B of Howard's 1st Georgia U.S. Infantry?)
  • Joseph Morris; 3rd sergeant.
  • Samuel Brown; 1st corporal. (Later in Company H, 5th Tennessee U.S. Infantry.)
Privates:

  • Anderson, Woodville B.
  • Allred, Elias R.; paroled by Gen. Wofford.
  • Berry, William A.; captured and killed. (William J. Berry; buried in the National Cemetery, Marietta, GA; had been in Company E, 23rd Georgia Confederate Infantry.)
  • Berry, Milas D.
  • Bearden, Ancil
  • Bearden, William M.
  • Bennette, Hiram
  • Brooks, Isham A.
  • Brown, Robert S.
  • Brooks, Alexander (Later in Company K, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry.)
  • Brock, John J.
  • Bruce,Madison
  • Bozeman, Henry B.
  • Bozeman, William A.
  • Brown, Thomas C.
  • Cantrell, Thomas A.
  • Cowart, Frances M. (Later in Company K, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry.)
  • Carney, L.B.; paroled by Gen. Wofford.
  • Coffey, Martin V.
  • Carney, Edmond; paroled by Gen. Wofford.
  • Carney, S.; paroled by Gen. Wofford.
  • Cunningham, Robert (Later in Company K 5th Tennessee US. Mounted Infantry)
  • Cook, Lemuel
    [Editor's Note: For more information please contact David Cook at Leftcoastyank@aol.com.]

    He writes: "Unfortunately, I don't have many tales from my family other than three brothers (Grandsons of the soldier in the 1st GA) marrying three sisters (whose father served in the Cherokee Legion, CSA)."

    "My great-great grandfather was Lemuel Cook (Co. D 1st Ga. Inf.). He and his eldest son, had tried to enlist in the Union Army and were turned down. He for a crooked back, and his son for being too young. I recently learned of this enlistment from someone else's research and was seeking to confirm it. His son, Elijah Cook, cut wood for the XX Corps when it occupied the Adairsville area and, later went on to become a well loved Methodist minister. Lemuel, named his next sons born following the war after Sherman and Grant (as middle names )."

    "The real genealogist in my family is my 2nd cousin..."

  • Chapman, John (Later in Company K 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry.)
  • Chambers, James
  • Chambers, William B. (Later in Company B, 6th Tennessee U.S. Infantry.)
  • Dearin, Reubin
  • Darnel Joshua; since died. (Later in Company K, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry.)
  • Darnell, Hiram A. (Later in Company K, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry.)

  • Darnell, Sion A. Sen. Sion Darnell, age 40+/- (Later in Company K, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry.)

  • Darnell, William J. (Later in Company K, 5th Tennessee U.S. Infantry.)
  • Evans, G.M.
  • Evans, Mirey
  • Goode, M.H.
  • Goode, Abram
    [Editor's Note: For more information please contact Fran Goode Akridge at franakridge@mindspring.com.]

    The Goodes from Pickens are mine. . .Abram is my g-grandfather.

    Abram passed down to his kids that he had "fought for the Union," and his second wife had family that fought for the Union, many of whom moved north or west following the war. His son, my step-grandfather and great uncle (he married his brother's widow), was a staunch Republican. My dad, [was] also a staunch Republican... My dad did say that Abram fought for love of the Union - not to end slavery - and both Abram's wife's folks, his mother's folks, and (probably) his father's folks owned slaves - although he did not.

    Abram also fought for the CSA and was captured and released at Vicksburg. At this time, I am trying to follow his life through the war years and would appreciate any help that I can find.

  • Griffeth, Robert; captured and killed.
  • George, James
  • Green, Garland S.D.
  • Goode, Silome (Later in Company K, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry.)
  • Hood, Tate
  • Honea, George M.
  • Heath, Griffin; died. (Later in Company K, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry.)
  • Hendrix, John (Later in Company K, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry.)
  • Hyde, A.A.
  • Howell, Robert R.
  • Howell, Russell
  • Howard, Samuel
  • Hood, Samuel
  • Howard, John L.
  • Jordan, John G. (Later in Company A of Howard's 1st Georgia U.S. Infantry.)
  • Lovin, Reubin; killed by the enemy.
  • Loveless, C.C.
  • Loveless, Abner T.
  • Manly, Lewis F.
  • Moss, John (Had been in Company I, 52nd Georgia Confederate Infantry.)
  • Martin, William P. (Later in Co. B, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry.)
  • McHan, W.M. (Later in Company K 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry.)
  • Manley, Julius C.
  • Mann, Emsly O.
  • Mosely, Albert (Later in Company B of Howard's 1st Georgia U.S. Infantry.)
  • Mullins, James P. (Later in Company B of Howard's 1st Georgia U.S. Infantry.) [Editor Note: For more information, please contact Mike Taylor, mikeinkaty@sbcglobal.net.]
  • Mullins, Martin B. (Later in Company B of Howard's 1st Georgia U.S. Infantry.) [Editor Note: For more information, please contact Mike Taylor, mike_in_katy@pdq.net.]
  • Mullins, Green D. (Later in Company B of Howard's 1st Georgia U.S. Infantry.) [Editor Note: For more information, please contact Mike Taylor, mikeinkaty@sbcglobal.net.]
  • McHan, Wilkie
  • McHan, Alfred
  • Mullins, George R. (Later in Company B of Howard's 1st Georgia U.S. Infantry.) [Editor Note: For more information , please contact Mike Taylor, mikeinkaty@sbcglobal.net].
  • McCravey, William
  • McHan, Henry
  • McCravey, D.S.
  • Nelson (?), William J. (written over Joseph Morris?); captured and killed.
  • Newman, James
  • Patterson, E.D. (Later in Company K, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry.)
  • Pinyan, James H.
  • Pinyan, Jacob
  • Padget, Isaac (Later in Company B of Howard's 1st Georgia U.S. Infantry.)
  • Payne, John W. (Later in Company B of Howard's 1st Georgia U.S. Infantry.)
  • Patterson, Hix (Later in Company K, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry.)
  • Patterson, Edward (Later in Company K, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry.)
  • Patterson, Asa (Later in Company K, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry
  • Pool, William (Later in Company K, 5th Tennessee U.S. Mounted Infantry.)
  • Presley, J. Marion Padget,
  • Alfred L.Padget,
  • William J. (Had been in Company I, 52nd Georgia Confederate Infantry; later in Company B of Howard's 1st Georgia U.S. Infantry.)
  • Padget, John
  • Roe, Ancil C.; captured and killed.
  • Russell, John Ray,
  • Thomas Sizemore, A.
  • Stone, James J.
  • Shirly, Nathan (Later in Company B, Howard's 1st Georgia U.S. Infantry.)
  • Swoffered, William M.
  • Turner, James (Had been in Company I, 52nd Georgia Confederate Infantry.)
  • Turner, Martin
  • Taylor, William (Later in Company K, 5th Tennessee US. Mounted Infantry.)
  • Taylor, Cicero H.
  • Taylor, Lewis C.
  • Turner, David; has since died.
  • Tally, John
  • Turner, Fielden
  • Turner, H.
  • Green B.
  • Turner, Memory
  • Townsend, David
  • Wigington, James S.
  • West, Columbus J.; paroled under Gen. Wofford.
  • Warren, Jeremiah
  • Watkins, Elias
  • Yancy, Obadiah
Certified By George H. Turner, January 14, 1870.

OTHERS:

The compilers of these rosters admitted that omissions and errors had occurred. A newspaper account of the fighting at Bucktown, for example, mentions that James M. Weaver, a deserter from Company G of the 39th Georgia Confederate Infantry, was among the members of Brown's 1st Georgia taken prisoner. Weaver's name does not appear on the above rosters or the lists of the men buried at the Marietta National Cemetery. Similarly, a Lewis Lively of Company B appears on Virgil D. Monroe's list of the members of the 1st Georgia executed at Gainesville and on early burial records at the National Cemetery, but not in the rosters.

The persons listed below are found in the records at the end of the microfrhm of the compiled service records of Howard's 1st Georgia U.S. Infantry under the title of "Cards Bearing Names That Do Not Appear on Rolls of the 1st Battalion Georgia Infantry". A copy of this microfilm is Reel 279-34 at the Georgia Department of Archives and History. Some of these men were members of James G. Brown's 1st Georgia State Troops Volunteers and others were probably men recruited by Dewitt C. Howard in late 1863 and 1864.

  • Young, Wilson Abercrombie
  • Jesse C. Cox; deserted May 4, 1865.
  • John Fitzgerald; deserted May 5, 1865.
  • Sargent M. Holcomb; deserted May 24, 1865.
  • John Jordon; deserted April 25, 1865.
  • Henry H. Masis; deserted April, 1865.
  • Richard Robison; deserted May 16, 1865.
299

  • Andrew B. Stewart; deserted June 18, 1865.
  • Leander J. Thompson; private; Company B, 1st Georgia Cavalry.
  • Francis Wisdom
  • Col. J.H. Ashworth; prisoner of war.
  • Capt. Wm. F. Curry (or Carry); Company A; wounded in the thigh, January 16, 1864.
  • James Davis; died of typhoid, March 5, 1864.
  • James B. Fowler; Company A; 1st Georgia Cavalry; died December 15 1864, of diarrhea; buried at Sharptop, Cherokee County, GA.
--------------

Source: A North Georgia Journal of History, Compiled and Edited By Olin Jackson, B.A., M.Ed., Copyright, 1989, by Legacy Communications, Inc., All Rights Reserved, Woodstock, GA, 30188.

If you wish to learn more about Brigadier General William T. Wofford, you are welcome to e-mail Kristi Gross.

For additional information, suggestions, or other messages, please contact Michael Gay.

Copyright © 1997-2009 Michael Gay. All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any form, in part or in whole is prohibited without written permission.

Published on May 11, 1997. Changes last made on October 03, 2009.

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